October 2018 Gemologist Jewelry Pick of the Month

by gesner12 on November 1, 2018

This month’s Gemologist jewelry Pick of the month is this fabulous Edwardian diamond antique engagement ring. Graydon Gesner selected this ring, as his favorite, because of the intricate filigree. Every part of this ring has been affected by the jeweler, including the embossing of the shank with floral designs.

 

This Edwardian diamond engagement ring features approx. .50 carat European Cut diamond with VS2 clarity and G/H color; wonderful clarity and color.  Additionally, the center diamond is accented with approx. .02 carat of Single Cut diamonds with VS1/VS2 clarity and G/H color. Notice the meticulous filigree and floral designs on the front and back sides of the ring mounting. Exceptional quality and attention to detail.

 

J35393

 

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Gabriel Ofiesh, based in Charlottesville, Virginia, works with a small staff of craftsmen who create and manufacture jewelry by hand.  “When I’m making a piece of jewelry, I think about rhythm and balance.  I also like unexpected details: things that move, flash, hide or surprise.  Using precious metal forms, fine gems and small diamonds, I aspire to find that surprise in each piece I make.”

 

This is a fabulous bold ring! It holds an impressive 10 carat Apx. cabochon shaped aquamarine.  The gem is surrounded by an 18 karat yellow gold bezel while the balance of the ring is crafted in sterling silver.  The unexpected detail of this ring is the square shank.  It is a very comfortable ring to wear and can be sized within reason.  The current ring size is 5-6.  Look for the maker’s mark in the shank “OFIESH” followed by the letter C within a circle.  A very unique ring!

 

J36507

10.3.2018

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 S. Kind & Son started their business in a small room on Market Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1872. They were known to have crafted mountings with diamonds to order. Their 1902-1903 catalogs contained diamond rings, one carat selling for $140, as well as ruby, sapphire and emerald rings, bracelets, pendants and brooches. Gents signet rings were sold in 10 karat and 14 karat gold containing a variety of gemstones, such as garnet, blood stone, jade and topaz, as examples. Ladies jewelry including enameled brooches, hat pins and sterling silver lockets and bracelets with charms were also available.

This breathtaking Art Deco (c.1920-1935) diamond Antique engagement ring, crafted in gleaming platinum, features a .53ct. apx. center European cut diamond with VS2 clarity and H bright white color.  Complimenting the center diamond are .15ct. apx. T.W. of single cut diamonds with VS2-SI1 clarity and H color. The ring has beautiful filigree and piercing!  Look for the maker’s mark inside the shank which represents true craftsmanship from S. Kind & Son!

 

J34909

10.15.18

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Founded in 1863, David Belais of the Belais Brothers created a new formula for the alternative to platinum. Platinum was a rare and expensive metal before it ultimately became banned from use because of the war effort. The white gold formula, after years of experimentation, was submitted to the patent office in October of 1918.  The new alloy combination became so popular it was called “Belais metal” or 18K Belais. Considered one of the first manufacturers to use the white gold metal formula, Belais created magnificent, detailed rings, brooches and pendants during the Art Deco Era.  Always a unique find, look for the Belais hallmark in the shank of a ring.

 

Here is a perfect example of a stunning diamond Belais antique engagement ring crafted in Belais 18K white gold.  It features a .65ct. Apx. European Cut diamond with fabulous VS2 clarity and G color.  Notice the detailed filigree, engraving and hallmark, 18K Belais, in the shank of the ring.  Really beautiful!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

J34749 

 

8.16.18

 

 

 

 

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S. KIRK & SON

September 7, 2018

S. Kirk & Son, a well-known manufacturer, first started as Silversmiths in 1815 with John Smith. As time passed, the Kirk Company began to manufacture fine jewelry between 1928-1938. Many of the records of this company have been lost from a tremendous fire so the dates are not certain.

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